Images to Tell a Story

Margaret Tarrant ~ Alice Stretched ~ from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ~ 1916 ~ via The Pictorial Arts

Margaret Tarrant ~ Alice Follows the White Rabbit ~ from Alices’s Adventures in Wonderland ~ 1916 ~ via The Pictorial Arts

Margaret Tarrant ~ The Pool of Tears ~ from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ~ 1916 ~ via The Pictorial Arts

Margaret Tarrant ~ Painting the Roses Red ~ from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ~ 1916 ~ via

Margaret Tarrant ~ The Stolen Tarts ~ from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ~ 1916 ~ via

Margaret Tarrant ~ from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ~ 1916 ~ via
liquidnight:

“Come, my head’s free at last!” said Alice in a tone of delight, which changed into alarm in another moment, when she found that her shoulders were nowhere to be found: all she could see, when she looked down, was an immense length of neck, which seemed to rise like a stalk out of a sea of green leaves that lay far below her.
“What can all that green stuff be?” said Alice. “And where have my shoulders got to? And oh, my poor hands, how is it I ca’n’t see you?” She was moving them about as she spoke, but no result seemed to follow, except a little shaking among the distant green leaves.
As there seemed to be no chance of getting her hands up to her head, she tried to get her head down to them, and was delighted to find that her neck would bend about easily in any direction, like a serpent. She had just succeeded in curving it down into a graceful zigzag, and was going to dive in among the leaves, which she found to be nothing but the tops of the trees under which she had been wandering, when a sharp hiss made her draw back in a hurry: a large pigeon had flown into her face, and was beating her violently with its wings.
“Serpent!” screamed the Pigeon.
“I’m not a serpent!” said Alice indignantly. “Let me alone!”
Arthur Rackham
1907 illustration for Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

More Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
liquidnight:

“If you’re going to turn into a pig, my dear,” said Alice, seriously, “I’ll have nothing more to do with you. Mind now!” The poor little thing sobbed again (or grunted, it was impossible to say which), and they went on for some while in silence.
Alice was just beginning to think to herself, “Now, what am I to do with this creature when I get it home?” when it grunted again, so violently, that she looked down into its face in solemn alarm. This time there could be no mistake about it: it was neither more nor less than a pig, and she felt that it would be quite absurd for her to carry it any further.
So she set the little creature down, and felt quite relieved to see it trot quietly away into the wood. “If it had grown up,” she said to herself, “it would have made a dreadfully ugly child: but it makes a rather handsome pig, I think.”
Arthur Rackham
1907 illustration for Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

More Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Arthur Rackham ~ The Pool of Tears from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll ~ William Heinemann Ltd. ~ 1907

Arthur Rackham ~ from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll ~ William Heinemann Ltd. ~ 1907
"They all crowded round it panting and asking, ‘But who has won?’"

Arthur Rackham ~ Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ~ William Heinemann ~ 1907
"An unusually large saucepan flew by it, and very nearly carried it off."